Monster Demands a Mate in Albany!

Universal Weekly, July 13, 1935:

“A palm to Charles A. Smakwitz, Warner’s Strand, Albany, N. Y., for a real smash front on ‘The Bride of Frankenstein.’ He certainly put EVERYTHING in it!  

“Cut-out heads of the monster from the twenty-four sheet dominated each end of the marquee. Eyes, mouth and chin were slit and backed with green gelatine and flasher lights mounted behind producing a very weird and eye-stopping display. A cut-out of the other twenty-four sheet was used over the main entrance doors.”  

“The emergency first  aid cabinet and the operating table with dummy bride were also part of the arresting display.”

“In addition to a wide distribution of heralds and letters to doctors and medical students, Smakwitz circulated ten thousand ‘warning’ cards, reading Beware, He’s Loose! The Monster Demands a Mate! Lookout for Karloff! Ten-thousand cards played up the not-for-kids angle.”

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

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The Egyptian-A Temple of Thebes

Exhibitors Herald-World, November 23, 1929:
“The Egyptian, located in the Brighton district of Boston, has just been opened. A foot or two from the sidewalk, one is transferred from the United States to Egypt, and everything within the four walls of the amusement center is symbolic of that ancient country. The Egyptian was designed by Eisenberg and Freer, architects of Boston.”   

“Inner foyer toward entrance to main foyer.” 

“Section of the main foyer from the entrance.”

“A section of the women’s lounge quarters.”

“The proscenium arch and organ lofts.”

Egyptian Theatre

 

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

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Potash and Movies

Motion Picture News, January 12, 1918:

“Potash mills put this small theatre on the map.”

“War Baby”

“J. J. Seigel is doing a thriving business in the Antioch Theatre, Antioch, Neb., a town of ten people. This is the smallest town in Nebraska to have a motion picture theatre. But just outside the boundary lines of the town of Antioch are big potash mills, built in haste since the waste lakes of potash in Nebraska have begun to make millionaires out of a few college boys who realized the war would shut off this nation’s  from outside.

“In these mills work scores of people who crowd the Antioch theatre every night. The house seats 100. Mr. Seigel is now building a theatre of 300–‘One of the best little houses in the state, too,’ he says.”

Creepy Ghost Town

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

AboutMe

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Medotcom

 

Grauman’s Temple of the Silent Art

grauman

Photo: Motion Picture News, March 2, 1918

Grauman’s Theatre opened with a star-studded gala premiere of “The Silent Man” starring William S. Hart who made a personal appearance. Not only was it Sid Grauman’s first theatre in Los Angeles but also the city’s first purpose-built movie palace. While the signage said “Grauman” it was referred to as the Million Dollar Theatre due to its alleged expense, officially adopting that name in 1922.

Motion Picture News, March 2, 1918:

graumans

“General view of building and theatre.”

interior

“Partial view of stage and orchestra, with some details
of Byzantine organ decorations at the right.”

hart

“At the right are shown some of the details of the Byzantine decorations of the organ screen. In the center are W. S. Hart and Sid Grauman in the Dome Room of the mezzanine and at the right stairway to the second balcony, including a portion of the larger dome of ceiling.”

 

ushers

“Girl ushers at Grauman’s”

“Sid Grauman has seen to it that every detail is in harmony and lends to the attractiveness of the theatre. Especially is true in the costumes of the sixteen girl ushers, who appear as Grauman’s Cadets, wearing striking uniforms of gray jackets and white trousets. These were designed by Edgar Temple, head of the Temple Costume Company, of 525 South Broadway, Los Angeles.”

Million Dollar Theatre

Los Angeles Conservancy

Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Bijou Theatre 318 Main Street, Holyoke, MA

Designed by architect Oscar Beauchemin, the Bijou opened in 1913 and was enlarged three years later.

Original Description:
“Theatre in workers’ section at Holyoke, Massachusetts”

Photographer: John Collier
October 1941

United States Farm Security Administration

Excerpts from Lost New England:
“Located on Main Street in the Flats neighborhood, it primarily catered to the city’s large population of factory workers, and it had one screen, with a seating capacity of 1,300.”

“…the Bijou was, at least by this point [1941], a second run theater. One sign under the marquee promises ‘Big Shows at Small Prices’, while another sign indicates that the theater offered ‘Entire New Show Every Sun. Tues. Fri.'”

The Springfield Republican, January 28, 1958:
“The Bijou property at the east side of Main St., north of Cabot St., which may be the site of a new parking facility for the South Holyoke area if the Board of Aldermen votes favorably on the order for the purchase of the property at a price of $51,500 plus the 1958 taxes, when the order is considered again at the meeting of Tuesday night next week.”

The Bjou was demolished in 1959 with a gas station now occupying the site.

Playing at the Bijou:
The Devil and Miss Jones
Thieves Fall Out

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Triboro “a new Loew neighborhood theatre”

Motion Picture Herald, April 11, 1931:

triboro

“Front and side exterior view showing the dominating sign features.  Executed in decorative brick and terra cotta, the facade carries out a modern theme with an introduction of Aztec motifs.”

triboro1
“The main foyer, looking from the lobby, Italian renaissance motifs are carried out in ornate gables and reed pilasters, panelled recesses and a vaulted ceiling that is very heavily ornamented.”


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

triboro3

“Looking down  a corridor on the mezzanine floor. Wall surfaces are plain, but furnishings and a delicately tinted ceiling in a floral pattern elaborate an Italian baroque theme ornamentally.”

triboro2

“Thye auditorium looking toward the rear. This chamber, seating 3,800 on two floors, has a decorative scheme representing an Italian garden wall executed in plaster and treated atmospherically.”

Loew’s Triboro
2804 Steinway Street
Astoria, NY

NYC AGO

QNS

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Westward Ho to Tokyo

Saga of the westward push to Oregon proves popular in Tokyo.

Exhibitors Trade Review, January 17, 1925:

coverwago_pe

“The Japanese police had to be summoned to get the crowds under control on the third day of the record-breaking run of the Paramount picture “The Covered Wagon” now making new motion picture history at the Chiyoda Kan Theatre in Tokyo.”

 

cwagon

 

 

 

The Covered Wagon

The Covered Wagon,  Silent Film Still Archive

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Crowdfunding Research

The Cinema Theatre Association (CTA) have asked me to speak at their monthly meeting in London. March 28th, 2020. This is my first overseas talk. It will add to my reputation as a theatre historian.


I have started a GoFundMe campaign to extend my stay, conducting research and visiting historic theatres.

Research will be used for future talks, essays, articles, etc. The theatres visited recorded and shared on social media.


Funds collected will go directly to travel within the UK, accommodations, food and everyday expenses.

Hippodrome_pe

gofundme

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Bliss in Sunnyside

Bliss Theatre
44-17 Greenpoint Avenue
Sunnyside, NY

Subway_pe_pe

From the 46th St. El, the former Bliss Theatre looms in the distance.

Motion Picture Herald, May 9th 1931:Bliss

“The Bliss Theatre in the Woodside [sic] section of New York City, one of the latest additions to the Century Circuit, seats 2,000 and has been designed in a modern interpretation of Egyptian architectural motifs, executed with simplicity, refinement and dignity.”

“Both interior and exterior designs are by William Rau of the Rau Studios, New York. Thomas R. Short was structural architect, and Theresa Jackson made the furniture selections used to complete the scheme and perserve the general motivating treatment embodied in rhe architecture.”

 

BlissTheatre

1940 Tax Photo

The Bliss acquired by Jehovah’s Witnesses in 1965 with all traces of paganism and nudity removed from the theatre’s decor.

Bliss_pe (Large)

Long Island Star-Journal, December 4,1965:
“Sunnyside’s Bliss Theatre this weekend begins its new career as the Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Assembly Hall with an open public talk at 3 P. M. tomorrow by district minister Walter R. Wissman on ‘The Meaning of the Resurrection of the Dead.'”

“The society took title to the 35-year-old theatre at 45th street and Greenpoint avenue from the Century Theatres chain Wednesday. While no figure was announced, it was estimated that the sum involved was in the neighborhood of a half million dollars.”

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Exteriors, Kings Theatre, Brooklyn

July 1, 2019 tour of the Kings Theatre arranged by Matt Thuma Lambros and conducted by Steven Ehrenberg, Director of Production.

with

Ken Roe–Founding member of the Cinema Theatre Association (UK) and editor of Cinema Treasures

Betty Sword, photographer

Interiors

 

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads