Loew’s Delancey

From the windows of the new Regal Essex 14 multiplex a glimpse of the old–the remains of the Loew’s Delancey.

Delancey Loews

Motography, April 1911:
“Plans have been filed by George A. Boehm, architect, for a moving picture theater to be erected at Delancey and Suffolk streets, New York City, for Ellen G. Gilbert at a cost of $40,000.”

This earlier building was not completed. The Loew’s Delancey opened March 1912 with a seating capacity of 1788, S. S. Sugar architect.

Alterations were carried out in 1918 by Thomas Lamb, job book 1136.

Loews

1940 Tax Photo

 

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Motion Picture Herald, February 26, 1938:
“Eye-arresting indeed was Albert Gutterman’s ‘The Last Gangster’ display at Loew’s Delancey Theatre, N. Y. C., representing a prison with large headlights and dummy machine guns mounted over all. Display was designed and created by H. Cooke of Gutterman’s staff.”

 

Coming Soon

Loew’s Delancey, 1978 Photo: Museum of the City of New York

 

The theatre closed June 1977 with the ground floor converted to stores.

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

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Regal Essex 14 & RPX

The Lower East Side has a new 14-screen multiplex. Opened April 6, 2019, at 129 Delancey Street, the Regal Essex 14 & RPX is part of Essex Crossings, a mix-use development in the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area.
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Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

AboutMe

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Medotcom

 

 

 

 

Joyce Theatre by Joseph Peller

Born in Toronto, Joseph Peller currently resides in New York City where he teaches Painting and Composition at the Art Students League.

Joyce

Theatre Crowd in the Rain Oil On Linen 30 X 44 In. ©  the Artist and Roberts Gallery

 

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Summer Evening, 2014, Oil on linen, 34 x 50 inches,  ACA Galleries, New York

 

The Joyce Theater is located in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood at 175 Eighth Avenue.

Opening in 1941 as the Elgin movie theatre, the building was gut-renovated and reconfigured in 1981-82 to reopen as the Joyce Theatre, a leading presenter of dance in New York City.

From the theatre’s website:
“One of the only theaters built by dancers for dance, The Joyce Theater has garnered a well-deserved international reputation for cultivating and honoring emerging and established dance artists whose work represents a wide range of aesthetic interests.”

 

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

AboutMe

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This is Baby Doll

Motion Picture Herald, October 20, 1956:

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“For ‘Baby Doll’: Warners this week completed its sign, probably the largest amusement display ever, for the run at the Victoria, Times Square, New York.”

“Warner publicists  put its size this way: a third of an acre.”

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

AboutMe

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Palace Theatre, 133-135 Essex Street, New York

palace

Photo:  P. L. Sperr, March 13, 1932

Opened by Charles Steiner, in 1914, the Palace replaced an earlier theatre on the site.

The Evening Telegram, January 18, 1908:
“Plans have also been filed… for remodeling the stable at No. 333 Essex street for occupancy as a moving picture exhibition, the change to be made for Markowitz & Elliot. L. C. Maurer and Steiner & Weiss are the architects.”

The Evening Post, September 1, 1908:
“Plans have been filed for remodeling the moving picture amusement show at 133 Essex street into a concert hall with a stage. The change of occupancy being made for  Steiner & Weiss, lessees, and D. Felix Towns, as owner.”

Beyond the Screen: Institutions, Networks, and Publics of Early Cinema, 2016
“A pivotal figure in this M & S circuit was Charles Steiner, who had started out in 1908 around the corner from Golden Rule Hall. In 1914, his old Essex Street nickelodeon gave way to the brand-new Palace Theatre (133-135) Essex) which seated six hundred.”

Despite what appears to be posters in the above photo, the marquee advertises  Loyal Furniture (“Shop Here!”).

In 1959, the building became the first Kosher-Chinese restaurant in New York, Bernstein-on-Essex Street, “where kashrut is king and quality reigns.”

essexkosher

New York World Telegram and Sun, April 22, 1966

 

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Walks also available at Local Expeditions

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

 

 

Taft Theatre, 37-11 Main Street, Flushing, NY

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Photograph: Percy Loomis Sperr, 1935

The Film Daily, January 18, 1932:
“The Taft, formerly the Flushing, has reopened under the management of the Kesena Amusement Corp.”

Excerpts from the Queens Chronicle, August 24, 2006:
“Following the death of William Howard Taft in 1930, the Kissena Amusement Corporation opened a movie theater in downtown Flushing to honor the memory of the 27th President of the United States.”

“Entrepreneurs David Rosenzweig and Micheal Kay were president and vice president of the Kissena Amusement Corporation. The movie theater managed on a day to day basis by Edward Sachs.”

“Following World War II, the Taft Theater was squeezed out by its competition, the RKO Keith’s and the Prospect Theaters, and was the first Flushing theater to close its doors. The site was quickly taken over by the W. T. Grant Department Store.”

 

ladies

On the marquee:

No More Ladies

Now or Never

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Walks also available at Local Expeditions

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

 

 

 

Aurora Borealis Lights Up Times Square

Universal Weekly, October 14, 1933:

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“Broadway ablaze! This mammoth electric sign covers the entire house-front of the Criterion Theatre. The letters S-O-S in the title flash on alternately. An Aurora Borealis effect is secured with irradiating  lights, and an airplane with practical propeller whirring  near the giant iceberg adds to the effect.

S-O-S Iceberg

Criterion Theatre

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Walks also available at Local Expeditions

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom