Beware the Lumnious Man in Dallas!

Universal Weekly, February 8, 1936:

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“Just take a look at the front on ‘The Invisible Ray’ designed by Louis Charninsky, Managing Director, Capitol Theatre, Dallas.

“There are no less than eight outstanding exploitation features represented, each would do any showman proud.

“At the extreme left is an electrical display, set up through the cooperation of the Dallas Light and Power Co. and the Southern Methodist University physics department. High voltage transformers, placed on a table behind plate glass for protection, produced jumping sparks.  Warning and explanatory signs added to the intrigue.

“The mechanical man, and ballyhoo man, dressed in metallic helmet and cloth cape similar to that worn by Karloff in picture, were used for an entire week around town and out front.

“The ‘invisible fish’ display followed  along the lines suggested in the pressbook, using clear water with a sign explaining the presence of invisible fish and asking the people to look for them.

“At the right side is a telescope focused on poster mounted on adjoining building. Behind Charninsky, looking through the telescope, is ‘The Luminous Man’ poster, available at all Universal Branches.

“Notice the 24-sheet poster cut-out above the front, and the six-sheet cut-outs on either side, in which red and green flashers were used behind the eyes.

“Charninsky, to interest the chemistry and physics students in the high schools and colleges, held a special invitation preview for the instructors who were asked to tell their students about the scientific angle of the picture.

“Newspaper ads and displays in windows around town played up the scientific angle.”

The Invisible Ray

 

 

Since 1997, legendary theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle has been conducting a popular series of  theatre talks and walks. Currently accepting bookings for 2017:  historical societies, libraries , senior centers, etc.

He has also joined with Local Expeditions to present a series of walking tours.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

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The Mummy Comes to Life in Paterson

Universal Weekly, March 25, 1933:

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“Edward Helwig, who manages the Rivoli Theatre in Paterson, N. J., believes in plenty of showmanship ballyhoo. This is clearly evidenced by his fine exploitation for ‘The Mummy.’

“Two giant cut-out heads of Karloff were used on top of the marquee with the star’s name and picture title in large cut-out letters. Under the marquee the front was decorated with cut-outs and flash shadow boxes.

“An amplifier was hooked up in the lobby with connection to the projection booth and the punch dialogue of the picture was carried to the street. The horn was concealed and the volume turned down so as to stir the curiosity of passerby.

“The local Rosicrucian Society was contracted and  letter of endorsement from the leader published in the newspaper.”

The Mummy

Rivoli Theatre

 

 

Since 1996, legendary theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle has been conducting a popular series of  theatre talks and walks. Currently accepting bookings for 2017:  historical societies, libraries , senior centers, etc.

He has also joined with Local Expeditions to present a series of walking tours.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

Light & Punchy Lure Patrons to the Roxy

Showmen’s Trade Review, May 25, 1940:

“Light and Punchy Headlines Lure Patrons”

roxy_pe

“Brilliant marquee displays at the Roxy Theatre, New York, combine bright lights with flexibility in the matter of headlining attractions.”

“Above, the extensive billing for the recent showing of UA’s ‘One Million B. C.’  Main lettering is 30 inches high. Wagner Sign Service Company’s lettering equipment is used at the Roxy. Frequently the theatre employs cutout blowups pf action photos of the Gae Foser Girls as pictorial display on the board extending east on 50th street–which would be a continuation of the panel at right in the photo above.”

One Million B. C.

Since 1996, legendary theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle has been conducting a popular series of  theatre talks and walks. Currently accepting bookings for 2017:  historical societies, libraries , senior centers, etc.

He has also joined with Local Expeditions to present a series of walking tours.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

Midnight Horror Show at the Loew’s Theatre, Richmond, VA

Showmen’s Trade Review, October 22, 1949:

Loews 2“If you’re going to put on a midnight horror show, reasoned Manager George Peters of Loew’s Theatre, Richmond, Va., then go out and ballyhoo it. And he did.

“He obtained five new Studebaker convertibles and paraded them around the downtown section the afternoon before the show. The first was driven by a blindfolded driver, the second contained the Monster and the others were filled with beautiful girls. Needless to say, the show was a sellout.

“Two of the convertibles are shown above. Snazzy, eh?”

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society Final volume published in September 2014.

He is available for theatre talks and walks in 2015: historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.